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Celebration of Scholars

Student Logo Competition

The Celebration of Scholars logo changes every year, and is designed by a current Carthage student. All students are invited to submit a logo design in the annual Celebration of Scholars Student Logo Contest.

The logo must visually convey the message of the Celebration of Scholars: Exposition of Student and Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creativity. The winning logo is announced and displayed at the Celebration of Scholars Poster Exhibition. The designer of the winning logo receives a cash prize of $250, and the opportunity to showcase his or her talent across and beyond the campus community.

Here are the student-designed logos that have represented the Celebration of Scholars to date:

 

COS 2017 logo

2017 — Becca Krahn ’16

“I spent a great deal of time studying symbols, colors, and scholastic verbiage that correlated with the message of the Celebration of Scholars. After concluding my research, the logo that I decided to pursue was an indigo and turquoise infinite triangle. This symbol represents the infinite loop of research, scholarship, and creativity that is pursued and developed year after year for this event.”


The 2016 Celebration of Scholars logo by Michelle Pisowodzki '15.

2016 — Michelle Pisowodzki ’15

“As many would know, the spark of an idea is often represented by a light bulb. I wanted to take this concept further by showing how scholar would embody a light bulb. I did this by designing a light bulb that incorporated the silhouette of a scholar’s head. The light illuminating in the bulb represents the students’ and faculty’s knowledge. A hand is placed around the head to grasp that knowledge and project to those around them like a light bulb would.”


Designed by Sean Rogers '15

2015 — Sean Rogers ’15

“For three years, the Celebration of Scholars has been a stage for students and faculty alike to showcase the hard work and dedication their projects required. There is one aspect of the Celebration of Scholars, though, that is rarely shown but always present: the pursuit of knowledge.

“Knowledge can only be acquired through questioning the world around us; by asking something specific of the world we live in. This pursuit is endless, and offers merely glimpses at the light of knowledge. But after true scholars catch their first glimpse of knowledge, they thirst for more. The Celebration of Scholars truly celebrates the ongoing pursuit each scholar continues to work toward.

“I decided to create an image that could encapsulate the goal each scholar has in mind: knowledge. A symbol of triumph after numerous failed attempts, the light bulb signifies the difficult but achievable journey to gain knowledge. The exterior of the light bulb also forms a question mark, as questioning our surroundings is what initially sparks the pursuit of knowledge. The filament of the light bulb, the brightest part of the bulb, spreads its light to the world around it. Just like the filament, the Celebration of Scholars allows scholars to share their knowledge with the world around them.”


Celebration of Scholars logo 2014

2014 — Emily Sebald ’13

“The logo I designed for the Celebration of Scholars 2014 is comprised of two concentric circles; each circle is made up of three distinct arcs. These three arcs stand for scholarship (or research), creativity, and celebration, which are the three aspects of this event. They also represent the different students that come together from multiple departments to make the Celebration a success. The arcs change in thickness as they travel around the circle, representing the concept that these projects start out as an idea, and then grow and change through research and experimentation until the final product is completed and presented at the Celebration. As a circle flows continuously, so the exchange of ideas and education continues to perpetuate at Carthage.”


The 2013 Celebration of Scholars logo by Dylan Wells '14.

2013 — Dylan Wells ’14

“The first project I was assigned as an intern was to develop a type-mark for the Celebration of Scholars using the specific font, Bodoni. ‘Scholars’ is given emphasis over ‘Celebration’ to highlight the academic achievements represented by the students and their findings. This is how I arrived at the ‘CS’ portion of the mark. I searched the webpage for Celebration of Scholars as well as some general pages on the school and found that Carthage divides its education into six areas. With this information, the number 6 became imperative for me to incorporate into the design. A piece of chemistry I remembered from chemistry classes was the ‘benzene ring.’ The benzene ring is both versatile and reactive and is found in molecular compounds studied in organic chemistry. It is represented in shorthand by a hexagon with a smaller circle in the center. The overlapping hexagons pull in a metaphor of Carthage’s style of education: The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The color scheme is a group of warmer reds and oranges to convey warmth, welcoming, and harmony to both participants and guests. The hexagons are translucent to highlight the blending and adaptability that comes with studying a wide variety of subjects at Carthage. The result is a logo that conveys a commemorative sense of higher education to those who are a part of this prodigious event at Carthage.”


The 2012 Celebration of Scholars logo by Kevin Cargo '13.

2012 — Kevin Cargo ’13

“The Celebration of Scholars working group approached the campus community to develop an identity for the event with the goal of visually conveying the message of the Celebration: to show the exposition of student and faculty research, scholarship and creativity. An event like this is unique, leaving much to the designer to imitate its meaning yet maintaining a visually appealing mark. I spent a great deal of time researching the meaning of the event and considering how to represent this in the icon.

“After my research, I arrived on the icon of the interlocked rings. A ring signifies completeness, planning, research and development of the participants coming together into a finished product. Lastly, they signify the joint collaboration of faculty and student research in one project. There is also great symbolism in the color selection and gradients, as each represents a specific Academic Division at Carthage. The deep reds signify the divisions of Interdisciplinary Studies & Education, as well as Carthage’s relationship with the Lutheran church. The yellows represent the departments of the Natural and Social Sciences. Lastly, the bold blue gradient stands for the Humanities and Fine Arts Divisions. The colors together represent the balanced, liberal arts education that Carthage offers to its students.

“The final result represents creativity, emulated through the mark itself as being visually interesting and appealing as well as recognizable and visible on campus.”


The 2011 Celebration of Scholars logo by Tyler Jump '11.

2011 — Tyler Jump ’11

“The Celebration of Scholars logo was designed in response to a prompt that requested the creation of a logo that emphasized ‘the true meaning behind the sharing of research, scholarship and creativity.’ The resulting logo represents each of these three terms in a single mark. Throughout the design process a number of themes were explored from the physics of friction to the history and heritage of research, scholarship and creativity. Ultimately, however, inspiration for the chosen mark came from the work of James Turrell, an American artist known for his work concerned with light and space. One piece in particular, ‘Wedgework III’, an installation using fluorescent light for The De Pont Museum in 1969, served as the primary inspiration. The concept of the artist’s work was to lead the viewer from darkness at the opening of the installation into a brilliant display of color and light. This concept of leading the viewer from darkness into light seemed a fitting analogy for what the Celebration of Scholars event intends to promote. The forms created by the concealed lamps in Turrell’s installation then also served to inform the shapes used to create the radiating “beams” of light in the mark. The resulting logo from this exploration of themes and ultimately from the inspiration of Mr. Turrell’s work now represents the Celebration of Scholars event.”