Skip to main content

Theatre

Past Seasons

 

 

2016-2017

The Invisible Hand

Written by Ayad Akhtar
Directed by Marie Treadway ’17 and Herschel Kruger

Showtimes:
7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8
3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13
7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15

In remote Pakistan, Nick Bright awaits his fate. A successful investment banker who has been kidnapped by an Islamic militant group, Nick takes matters into his own hands when no one will negotiate for his release. Full of questionable alliances and moral bargaining, The Invisible Hand is a chilling examination of how far we will go to survive and the consequences of the choices we make.
Get tickets

Carthage Theatre Presents "The Invisible Hand"

 

Marriage à la Mode

Written by John Dryden
Directed by Neil Kristian Scharnick

Showtimes:
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5
3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12

This enduring restoration play is updated to 1930 Sicily for a charming and engaging look at love and relationships. Blending satire and romance, Dryden’s masterpiece demonstrates that the most stylish love is simple and true.
Get tickets

Marriage A La Mode

 

Vet Night of the Arts

Join for Carthage College’s Vet Night of the Arts at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 15 in Wartburg Theatre. This evening of theatre, dance, video, and visual art is inspired by those who serve. Both veterans and non-veterans are welcome. The night will feature the following people:

  • Matthew Hefti, Wisconsin author
  • Yvette Pino, Veteran Print Project
  • Edwin Olvera, Choreographer, dancer
  • Stacy Pottinger, Carthage Dance Program

There will be an open discussion with the artists along with refreshments and raffle prizes from local businesses. All proceeds go to support Veterans Outreach of Wisconsin, assisting homeless veterans in Southeast Wisconsin.
Get tickets

Vet Flyer

 

Vanishing Point

Concert Coordinator/Director: Stacy Pottinger

Showtimes:
7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10
3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11

An expressionist work about a self-fulfilling prophecy, a complex investigation of partner work and weight sharing, a formalist work that is both dynamic and intriguingly developed — Vanishing Point is a program of dance works featuring choreography by Artistic Director Stacy Pottinger, as well as guest choreographers Valerie Gonzalez and Piper Morgan Hayes.
Get tickets

Vanishing Point

 

The Regina Taylor Project: A Seat at the Table (New Play Initiative World Premiere)

Written by Regina Taylor
Directed by Martin McClendon
Music Direction by Dimirti Shapovalov

Showtimes:
7:30 p.m. Friday, March 3
7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 4
3 p.m. Sunday, March 5
7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 9
7:30 p.m. Friday, March 10
7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 11

Our new play commission for 2017 focuses on the life of voting rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer, from her beginnings in abject poverty to the halls of power in Washington, where she testified before Congress with the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Utilizing iconic songs immortalized during the struggle for civil rights, this new play will span Ms. Fannie Lou Hamer’s life while still connecting to contemporary struggles regarding race.
Get tickets

“Nobody's free until everybody's free.” — Fannie Lou Hamer

 

The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Written by Rupert Holmes
Directed by John Maclay
Music Direction by Amy Haines and E. Ed Kawakami

Showtimes:
7:30 p.m. Friday, April 28
7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 29
3 p.m. Sunday, April 30
7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 4
7:30 p.m. Friday, May 5
7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 6

Based on the unfinished manuscript of Charles Dickens’ last novel, Drood features an interactive twist: every night, the audience gets to choose the ending!
Get tickets

The Mystery of Edwin Drood

 

2015-16

Afghanistan/Wisconsin Verbatim Theatre Project    

Written by Laurel Mckenzie ’16 and Martin McClendon
Directed by Martin McClendon

The Afghanistan/Wisconsin Verbatim Theatre Project is a new play about the experiences of Wisconsin veterans of the Afghanistan conflict, based on personal interviews with local veterans collected over the summer of 2015. With the mission of fostering better understanding between vets and non-vets, the play will take audiences inside the reality of training, deployment, and re-entry into the civilian world. Come see and hear veteran’s stories and viewpoints, in the veteran’s own words!

 

Stage Kiss  

Written by Sarah Ruhl
Directed by Herschel Kruger

When two actors with a history are thrown together as romantic leads in a forgotten 1930’s melodrama, they quickly lose touch with reality as the story they enact onstage follows them offstage. Stage Kiss is the newest play from award-winning playwright Sarah Ruhl, an artist gifted with a singular voice. It is a charming tale about what happens when lovers share a stage kiss—or when actors share a real one.

 

 

Dance Concert: Juxtapositions

  • Concert Coordinator/Director: Stacy Pottinger

Carthage presents its fall dance concert, Juxtapositions, a web of dance works woven by moments of curious, delightful, and unexpected juxtapositions. The program features choreography by guests Valerie Gonzalez, Piper Morgan Hayes, Kristina Saldarelli, and emerging choreographers, Megan Brancato, Libby Nelson, and Samantha Thone.  

 

The Breath of Stars (New Play Initiative World Premiere)

Written by Caridad Svich
Directed by Neil Kristian Scharnick

The eighth installment in Carthage Theatre’s New Play Initiative is about the spinning globe, a lost city of strings, electric dreams, and finding a lover again in the body of a stranger.

The Breath of Stars looks at the workings of memory through stories of love and loss in the contemporary world. Written by Obie-Award winning playwright Caridad Svich specially for Carthage Theatre, the play reconfigures Shakespeare’s Tempest for the digital age.  A modern day Ariel has lost someone named Prospero, who is now only a picture in cyberspace. Another Ariel — perhaps a double or mirror image of the first — misses him too. As the Ariels move through spaces of loss, other worlds open up, revealing a haunting group of characters and stories, all tied together through the invisible bonds of technology.

 

 

Urinetown

Written by Mark Hollmann and Greg Kotis
Directed by guest artist Mary MacDonald Kerr

Winner of three Tony Awards, Urinetown is a hilarious musical send-up of capitalism, social irresponsibility, bureaucracy, and musical theatre itself!  In a dystopian future, a 20-year drought has led to a ban on private toilets. Citizens must use public toilets regulated by an evil company that profits by charging admission for one of humanity’s most basic needs. From within the oppressed masses, a hero plans a revolution that could lead them all to freedom!  Carthage welcomes noted Milwaukee area actor/director Mary Macdonald Kerr to direct our production.

 

Dance Concert: Away From The Mirror

Student Concert Coordinator: Libby Nelson
Directed by Kristina Saldarelli

Carthage presents its annual student dance concert, Away From The Mirror, providing Carthage’s emerging artists opportunities to develop and share their inspirations through dance, to learn about the choreographic process, and to share in the development of their own production. The program will feature new dance works developed by dance minors in a less produced revelation of the dance making process.

 

2014-15

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead    

Written by Tom Stoppard
Directed by Neil Kristian Scharnick

This clever and absurd Tony-­winning comedy turns Hamlet on its head, telling Shakespeare’s classic tale from the bewildered perspective of two incidental characters, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Follow them as they weave in and out of Hamlet’s troubled life, trying to make sense of their own.

 

 

Day After Night    

Written by Mikaley Osley ’14, adapted from the novel by Anita Diamant
World Premiere
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Day After Night is based on the extraordinary true story of the 1945 rescue of more than two hundred prisoners from the Atlit internment camp, run by the British military near the Mediterranean coast south of Haifa. Set in the aftermath of the Second World War, the story is told through the eyes of four young women at the camp with profoundly different stories. Haunted by unspeakable memories and losses, afraid to begin to hope, Shayndel, Leonie, Tedi, and Zorah find salvation in the bonds of friendship and shared experience even as they confront the challenge of re­creating themselves in a strange new country.

Day After Night is a world premiere adaptation of Anita Diamant’s powerful novel, written by Carthage Theatre alum and award-­winning playwright Mikaley Osley ’14. The culmination of several years of collaboration and work, the play is a compelling addition to Carthage’s First Year Experience program.

 

 

Faculty Directed Dance Concert: Points of Departure

Concert Coordinator/Director: Stacy Pottinger

The Carthage Theatre Department presents its formal concert of dance works mined from the unique choreographic inquiries of its dance faculty, guest artists, and students. This season’s concert will continue to engage audiences, as it has in the past, through vibrant performances and dances that are each points of departure into kinesthetic discourses.

 

 

Up the Hill

Written by Keith Huff
New Play Initiative World Premiere
Directed by Martin McClendon

Every Spring, Carthage Theatre’s New Play Initiative gives you the opportunity to see a world premiere play from a prominent writer. This year acclaimed Emmy Award-winning screenwriter and playwright Keith Huff (AMC’s Mad Men, Netflix’s House of CardsA Steady Rain on Broadway) crafts a gripping story of youthful idealism confronting terrible choices. Jill and Jack are new congressional interns, each excited to be serving their country in Washington D.C.’s corridors of power. But before very long, both of them get caught in a web of blackmail and political intrigue that will force them to question everything they believe. Against all odds, can they really make a difference? Or will they become part of the problem? Come see the twists and turns they take in our world premiere production of Keith Huff’s latest work. 
* This play is intended for mature audiences due to its adult content.

 

 

 

Dance Concert: Away From The Mirror

Artistic Direction by Stacy Pottinger
Featuring choreography by Carthage Dance Minors

This unique presentation by Carthage dance minors features new dance works created by our very own emerging choreographers­­ each sharing their inspirations through dance in a less formal revelation of the dance making process. The program culminates from a series of feedback showings through which works are presented as drafts at different stages of development. Choreographers introduce their work and engage in discussion with audiences following the performance.

 

 

 

Man of La Mancha

Written by Dale Wasserman, Joe Darion, and Mitch Leigh
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Adapted from Miguel de Cervantes’ famous novel Don Quixote. Winner of five Tony Awards, Man of La Mancha is one of the best ­loved musicals of all time. Poet and playwright Miguel de Cervantes is arrested and put in prison by the soldiers of the Spanish Inquisition after staging a comic performance mocking the Spanish government. Awaiting trial, Cervantes is assailed by his fellow prisoners, who try to seize the manuscript of his masterpiece, Don Quixote. His inspired response: a challenge to join him in staging his stirring tale of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, a noble knight and his sidekick bent on an obsessive quest to attain an impossible dream.

 

The Motherf****r With the Hat

Written by Steven Adly Guirgis
Directed by Abbey Bobzin ’15

With the help of his girlfriend Veronica, AA sponsor Ralph D., and devoted cousin Julio, recovering addict Jackie is out on parole and ready to get his life on track. When he sees an unfamiliar hat sitting on the table, Jackie questions his progress and the mysterious hat that threatens all he’s worked for. Full of poetic profanity and raw power, The Motherf**ker with the Hat hilariously delivers a touching account of broken people and their struggle to become whole.

WARNING: ADULT CONTENT, for mature audiences only

 

Devised Theatre Project    

Directed by Nicole Middleton ’15

Carthage Theatre’s focus on new work continues with our final production of the season. Using devised ­theatre and improvisational­ theatre methods, a team of Carthage Theatre students and designers, led by student director Nicole Middleton ’15, will create a brand new play. There’s no telling what this bunch of smart, creative young artists will come up with, but one thing is certain: you don’t want to miss it! 

2013-14

Stars in the Morning Sky

By Alexander Galin
United States premiere of a new translation and adaptation by Chris Hannan
Directed by Martin McClendon

Synopsis:

It’s 1980 and the Olympic torchbearer is approaching a proud and eager city of Moscow. But not every proud Russian is allowed to join the celebration; the government wants to show the world a sanitized version of the Soviet Union. A band of exiled “undesirables” pass this unforgettable night together beyond the outskirts of the city, sharing a night of anger, humor, despair, and hope. (See Photos)

 

As You Like It

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Anna Antaramian

Synopsis:

Join Rosalind, Celia, and Touchstone on their adventurous flight into the Forest of Arden in Carthage Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s beloved classic. Directed by faculty member Anna Antaramian, As You Like It is among Shakespeare’s most celebrated pastoral comedies: a heartwarming tale of rejection, redemption, loyalty, and love. (See Photos)

 

Dance Concert: Kinesthetic Chitchat

Artistic Direction by Stacy Pottinger
Featuring choreography by Carthage Dance Faculty and guests

Synopsis:

The Theatre Department presents its formal concert of dance works mined from the unique choreographic expressions of its dance faculty and students. This season’s concert will continue to engage audiences, as it has in the past, by presenting vibrant and diverse dances, inspiring performances, and by lighting the kinesthetic spark within us all.

 

Smoking Lesson

Directed by Student Director Bitzy Coats

Synopsis:

Smoking Lesson is a coming-of-age adventure filled with secrets, deception, and transformation. In the midst of sharing a dangerous secret under an old railroad trestle, Tare and her friends meet the local burnout, Tom.  He teaches the three girls how to smoke with class, but stirs up trouble in their friendship.  As Tom’s relationship with Tare unfolds, so do her secrets—with tragic results.

 

No Name (World Premiere)

By Jeffrey Hatcher
Adapted from the novel by Wilkie Collins
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Synopsis:

A sheltered, well-to-do young Englishwoman and her sister are thrown into poverty overnight by a distant relative who lays claim to their inheritance. Desperate to protect her family, the daring young Magdalen bands together with a shifty con man and hatches an outrageous plot to reclaim her wealth. But can she win a fortune without losing her soul?

Carthage Theatre is thrilled to announce Jeffrey Hatcher as the 2013-2014 participant in its New Play Initiative. Hatcher’s original works and adaptations have been seen and celebrated in New York, across the country, and internationally, with productions at the Guthrie, the Old Globe, Manhattan Theatre Club, the Milwaukee Rep, Yale Rep, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, The Acting Company, Cleveland Playhouse, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Denver Center, Philadelphia Theatre Company, Seattle Rep, Arizona Theatre Company, and countless more. Screenwriting credits include: Stage Beauty (adapted from his play Compleat Female Stage Beauty), Casanova, and The Duchess. For Carthage, Hatcher will be adapting the endearing Wilkie Collins novel, “No Name.” (See Photos)

 

Dance Concert: Away From The Mirror

Artistic Direction by Stacy Pottinger
Featuring choreography by Carthage Dance Minors

Synopsis:

2014 marks the fifth anniversary of the student dance concert, Away From The Mirror! The presentation will again feature new dance works created by Carthage’s own emerging choreographers, each sharing their inspirations through dance in a less formal revelation of the dance making process. The program will culminate from a series of feedback showings through which works are presented as drafts at different stages of development. This year, the concert will feature choreographers and performers engaged in their craft as they develop their works from the studio to the stage.

 

Mercy Killers

By Michael Milligan
Directed by Tom Oppenheim

Synopsis:

Joe loves apple pie, Rush Limbaugh, the 4th of July and his wife, Jane. He is blue-collar, corn-fed, made in the USA and proud, but when his uninsured wife is diagnosed with cancer, his patriotic feelings and passion for the ethos of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are turned upside down. In Mercy Killers, a one-man play with Broadway actor Michael Milligan, Joe struggles with the uniquely American experience of losing your health in the land of plenty. Read more about Mercy Killers.

 

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

By David Yazbek and Jeffrey Lane
Directed by Neil Kristian Scharnick

Synopsis:

Con artist Lawrence has it made, living a life of sophisticated luxury on the French Riviera. His peace and livelihood are threatened when an American hustler known as “the Jackal” arrives in Lawrence’s posh domain. Adapted from the popular 1988 film, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels asks how far a man is willing to go—or how low a scoundrel is willing to stoop—to win a bet and make a buck. (See Photos)

 

The Inn

By Mikaley Osley
Directed by Courtney Matula

Synopsis:

Perched on the edge of the Abyss, Charlotte manages an inn for Soul Collectors, who escort the newly deceased to Hell. But what happens when a soul scheduled for delivery goes missing?  Needless to say the devil’s not happy. Join us and see how Charlotte and her guests face up to their lives (and deaths) in an epic struggle for a wayward soul.

 

2012-13

Boeing Boeing

Written by Marc Camoletti
Directed by Martin McClendon

Synopsis:

It’s the swinging sixties in Paris, and Bernard, a successful architect, has a big secret: he’s juggling three air hostess fiancées at once! So far the airline timetables keep the ladies from meeting each other, but that’s about to change as the superfast new Boeing jets come into service! This Tony-winning comedy will keep you laughing from takeoff until the final bumpy landing! (See Photos)

 

Tartuffe

Written by Moliere
Translation by Richard Wilbur
Directed by John Maclay

Synopsis:

French playwright Moliere’s brilliant satire of religious quackery, Tartuffe is a haughty, self-righteous phony who inveigles his way into a wealthy household. Not content with robbing his host blind in the name of the Almighty, Tartuffe also sets about to seduce the lady of the house. When the play was originally presented, Moliere was forced to shoehorn in a scene showing Tartuffe’s punishment at the hands of the authorities; the best possible way of distancing Tartuffe’s fraudulent piety from the real-life power abuses then being perpetrated by the Church. (See Photos)

 

Moveable Moments

Artistic Director Stacy Pottinger Featuring choreography by Carthage Dance faculty and guests

Synopsis:

“Moveable Moments” features new dances created by distinctive choreographic voices for the Carthage Theatre Department’s annual dance concert. This year’s concert will present new dance works by faculty, guests and students and will feature a new repertory work by a legacy dance artist made possible through the American Dance Legacy Initiative’s Repertory Etudes Instructional Collection. Watch Carthage dance artists stretch, turn, leap and reach to greater heights as they transform moveable moments into moving dance experiences.

 

A Clamour of Rooks

Written by Martin Maguire in collaboration with Carthage Theatre and Patrick Sutton of the Gaiety School of Acting, National Theatre School of Ireland Directed by Neil Scharnick

Synopsis:

Prodigal daughter Sophia returns home to care for her dying mother, not sure how or why. Her efforts to save her mother and find reconciliation lead her on a nightmarish fairy-tale journey deep into the unspeakable memories of their troubled past. “A Clamour of Rooks” is not a fairy tale, it is an explorartion of how fairy tales both reveal and obscure the scary and painful realities of human existence. This new play by Irish dramatist Martin Maguire, in collaboration with Carthage Theatre and the Gaiety School of Acting, National Theatre School of Ireland, premieres at historic Smock Alley Theatre—1662 before coming to Carthage. (See Photos)

 

Spring Awakening

Music by Duncan Sheik
Book and Lyrics by Steven Sater
Directed by Herschel Kruger
Choreography by Faith Mitchell

Synopsis:

Winner of 8 Tony Awards, including best musical, “Spring Awakening” celebrates the unforgettable journey from youth to adulthood with a power, poignancy, and passion that you will never forget. Adapted from Frank Wedekind’s 1891 expressionist play about the trials, tears and exhilaration of the teen years, it has been hailed as the “Best Musical of the Year” by the New York Times, New York Post, Star Ledger, Journal News, New York Observer, and USA Today. (See Photos)

 

The Glass Menagerie 

Written by Tennessee Williams
Directed by Mitch Weindorf

Synopsis:

Journey up the fire escape and into the Wingfield home as Tom narrates the audience through “truth in a pleasant disguise of illusion.” His mom, Amanda, overcome by recollections of her days as a Southern belle, projects impossible standards on her shy daughter Laura. Crippled in body and spirit, Laura dotes upon a world of fragile glass animals. Amanda’s hopes and dreams for Laura seem to be fulfilled when Tom brings home a gentleman caller for his sister. The Glass Menagerie marked a crucial turning point in American theater and brought critical success to Tennessee Williams. The tragedy, fragility, and tenderness of this “memory play” have made it one of America’s most powerful, timeless and compelling plays.

 

Student Dance Show 

Performance in Wartburg Auditorium

Synopsis:

For the fourth year, Carthage dance minors will present a student dance concert. This showcase of dance works provides student dances the opportunity to develop and present their own choreography in an informal setting. The program features a variety of dance styles including jazz, tap, ballet, hip-hop, and contemporary dance, with performances by Carthage students.

 

No Exit

Written by Jean Paul Sarte
Directed by Shannon Fox

Synopsis:

Imagine that hell is an eternity spent with the two other people you despise the most. You never sleep, and the lights never go out. “No Exit” was written in 1944 by Jean Paul Sarte who composed the original original draft in two weeks at the Café Flore in Paris. It is considered by many to be the author’s best play and most accessible dramatization of his philosophy of existentialism.

 

2011-12

Almost Maine 

Written by John Cariani
Directed by Neil Scharnick

Synopsis:

Almost Maine follows the residents of the remote, mythical town of Almost, Maine. As the northern lights hover in the star-filled sky above, Almost’s residents find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and often hilarious ways. (See Photos)

 

Inspecting Carol

Written by Daniel J. Sullivan
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Synopsis:

In this hilarious hit from Seattle, a man who asks to audition at a small theatre is mistaken for an informer for the National Endowment for the Arts. It’s A Christmas Carol meets The Government Inspector meets Noises Off.

 

Imagine, Inspire, Illuminate

Artistic Director Stacy Pottinger Featuring choreography by Carthage Dance faculty and guests

Synopsis:

Each year, the Theatre Department stages a formal concert of new dance works mined from the inspirations of its talented faculty and students. The show is choreographed by Stacy Pottinger, adjunct assistant professor of theatre, and guests. As an experimental cornerstone to the department’s developing dance minor program, this annual concert provides opportunities for student dancers to grow as performing artists and permits creative endeavors within the discipline of dance to have a home at Carthage.

 

Ghost Bike

Written by Laura Jacqmin
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Synopsis:

In Ghost Bike, Ora and Eddie, best friends since elementary school, fall in love with the city on their bikes. But when Eddie is hit by a car and killed, Ora refuses to let him go. Armed only with an electric map of ghost bike memorials, Ora rides beneath the city to have one last conversation with her friend. (See Photos)

 

The Drowsy Chaperone

Music by Lias Lambert and Greg Morrison
Directed by Martin McClendon

Synopsis:

The curtain rises on a present-day musical theatre fanatic eager to tell the audience about his favorite Broadway musical, The Drowsy Chaperone. He’s the ultimate Everyfan and Drowsy is his guilty pleasure. As he begins listening to the rare cast recording, the show cleverly and magically blooms to life, telling the hilarious tale of a pampered Broadway starlet and her debonair fiance, an overzealous producer, a dizzy chorine, a Latin lover and a couple of bumbling gangsters. Ruses are played, hi-jinks occur, and the plot spins everyone into musical comedy euphoria. (See Photos)

 

Away From the Mirror

Choreographed by Carthage Dance Minors
Concert Coordinator: Stacy Pottinger

Synopsis:

For the third year, Carthage dance minors will present a student dance concert. This showcase of dance works provides student dancers the opportunity to develop and present their own choreography in an informal setting. The program features a variety of dance styles including Jazz, Tap, Ballet, Hip Hop, and Contemporary Dance with performances by Carthage students who want to dance.

 

2010-11

Biloxi Blues

Written by Neil Simon
Directed by Thomas Novak

Synopsis:

Second in Neil Simon’s semi-autobiographical Brighton Beach Trilogy, Biloxi Blues follows Eugene M. Jerome through basic training in Biloxi, Mississippi in the summer of 1943. Accompanying Eugene on his ride from Fort Dix, New Jersey, are a group of boys from all along the east coast who get sculpted into men by a sergeant as hard as the metal plate in his head. Eugene has three goals to accomplish while fighting in this war; to become a writer, to not get killed and to lose his virginity. (See Photos)

Biloxi Blues was performed at Carthage College.

 

Dead Man’s Cell Phone

Written by Sarah Ruhl
Directed by Neil Scharnick

Synopsis:

A woman sits alone in a quiet cafe—quiet but for the incessant ringing of a cell phone. Why won’t its owner answer? Because he’s dead. So begins this wildly imaginative new comedy by MacArthur “Genius” Grant recipient and Pulitzer finalist Sarah Ruhl. What follows is the unpredictable odyssey of a woman forced to face her assumptions about morality, redemption, and the need for human connection in a technology-crazed world. (See Photos)

 

Away From The Mirror

Choreographed by Carthage Dance Minors
Concert Coordinator: Stacy Pottinger

Synopsis:

For the second year, Carthage dance minors will present a student dance concert. This showcase of dance works provides student dancers the opportunity to develop and present their own choreography in an informal setting. The program features a variety of dance styles including Jazz, Tap, Ballet, Hip Hop, and Contemporary Dance with performances by Carthage students who want to dance.

 

The Rail Splitter

Written by Guest Artist Rick Cleveland
Directed by Martin McClendon

Synopsis:

“The Rail Splitter” a new play by Rick Cleveland, is a searing and satiric docudrama-for-the-stage chronicling the author’s attempts to write a new play about Abraham Lincoln as a young man. The student actors of Carthage College who took part in it lived through a theatrical eperience that proved controversial, sublimely ridiculous, and tragic, but that also illuminated the human condition as only theatre can do. (See Photos)

 

Kinetic Horizons

Choreographed by Stacy Pottinger and guests

Synopsis:

Each year, the Theatre Department presents a formal concert of new dance works mined from the inspirations of its talented faculty and students. As an experiential cornerstone to the department’s developing dance minor program, this annual concert provides opportunites for student dances to develop as performing artists and permits new creative endeavors within the discipline of dance to have a home at Carthage College. This season’s concert will continue to broaden our kinetic horizons, by presenting vibrant and diverse dances, engaging performances, and by lighting the thrill of moving and of being moved within us all.

 

Cabaret

Written by Joe Masteroff
Directed by Herschel Kruger
Music by John Kander and Lyrics by Fred Ebb

Synopsis:

At a night club in Berlin, as the 1920s are drawing to a close, the master of ceremonies assures the audience that they will forget their troubles at the Cabaret. Heading for Berlin is Clifford Bradshaw, a young impoverished American writer roaming Europe searching for inspiration for novel number two. He is joined by Ernst Ludwig, an attractive young Berliner who appears to be in the smuggling business. Musical numbers include It Couldn’t Please Me More, Wilkommen, Caberet, Don’t Tell Mama and Two Ladies.

 

Doubt: A Parable

Written by John Patrick Shanley
Directed by student Lauren Bianchi

Synopsis:

Sister Aloysius, head principal at St. Catherine’s school and parish, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects the young priest, Father Flynn, of improper relations with one of the male students. With the suspicions of Sister James in hand, Aloysius calls in the priest to confront him and then the young boy’s mother to reveal her suspicions. An unexpected turn of events leaves Sister Aloysius with more Doubt than ever.

 

Beautiful Bodies

Written by Laura Shaine Cunningham
Directed by student Sarah Sellars

Synopsis: 

Six long-time friends reunite to throw a baby shower one evening for their friend Claire. Differing personalities and ideals clash as the women talk about choices they have made. Their stories show the struggle between wanting to be independent and not wanting to be alone as they confront the fact that the “love” that they dreamed of when they were seven might not be that easy to find. As the night goes on these women are able to find things to laugh about, talk about (and fight about) as they consider decisions they have made.

 

2009-10

Room Service

Written by John Murray and Allen Boretz
Directed by Martin McClendon

Synopsis:

New York, 1937: Producer Gordon Miller is rehearsing Broadway’s next hit play. It’s a great show, but without investors it’s going nowhere. The author is thinking of giving the rights to someone else, and to top it off, he and his cast are about to get locked out of their hotel! If he can just stay in his room long enough to meet the right backer. Gordon’s crew of theatrical con-men (and women!) will have to employ every trick in the book to outwit and outlast the hotel manager and the bill collectors, convince a skittish backer, and hold on to their show until the final curtain! (See Photos)

Room Service was performed at Carthage College.

 

Lysistrata

Written by Aristophanes
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Synopsis:

The third and concluding play of Aristophanes’ War and Peace series. It is now the twenty-first year of the Peloponnesian War and there seems as little prospect of peace as ever. A desperate state of things demands a desperate remedy in this comical account of one woman’s extraordinary mission to end the war. Lysistrata convinces the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands as a means of forcing the men to negotiate a peace.

Lysistrata was performed at Carthage College.

 

Far Away

Written by Caryl Churchill
Guest Directed by Linda Gillum

Synopsis:

A mysterious journey of a girl who witnesses beauty and destruction in a world where humans, animals and the elements conspire against each other. Parental figures and animals protect their
young while siding with oppositional forces. Caryl Churchill’s powerful, haunting play is alluring and disturbing and will stay with you long after you leave the theatre.

Far Away was performed at Carthage College.

 

One Day in the Season of Rain

Written by Mohan Rakesh
New Translation by Aparna Dharwadker and Vinay Dharwadker
Directed by Neil Scharnick

Synopsis:

As rain soaks the Indian countryside, local poet Kalidasa has a difficult decision to make. He has been invited to claim the title of court poet — a title promising fame and glory. However, to accept this honor would mean leaving behind the village that bore him and the woman who inspires him. This newly retranslated play is both a touching love story and a modern imagining of the life and trials surrounding India’s greatest classical poet. (See Photos)

 

Sunday in the Park with George

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by James Lapine
Directed by Herschel Kruger

Synopsis:

Originally nominated for 10 Tony Awards and winning the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, this Broadway musical was inspired by the painting, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Isle of La Grande Jatte,” by Georges Seurat. A complex work revolving around a fictionalized Seurat immersed in single-minded concentration while painting the masterpiece.

Sunday in the Park with George was performed at Carthage College.

 

Higher Altitudes

Choreographed by Carthage Dance Faculty
Annie Hackett and Stacy Pottinger

Synopsis:

The Theatre Department produces the third annual dance concert featuring choreography by Carthage dance faculty Annie Hackett and Stacy Pottinger.

 

W;T

Written by Margaret Edson
Directed by Thomas Novak

Synopsis:

Vivian Bearing, Ph.D., a renowned professor of English who has spent years studying and teaching the brilliant and difficult metaphysical sonnets of John Donne, has been diagnosed with terminal ovarian cancer. Her approach to the study of Donne: aggressively probing, intensely rational. But during the course of her illness — and her stint as a prize patient in an experimental chemotherapy program at a major teaching hospital — Vivian comes to reassess her life and her work with a profundity and humor that are transformative both for her and the audience.

 

2008-09

Rabbit Hole

Written by David Lindsey-Abaire
Directed by Dana Peters

Synopsis:

Becca and Howie Corbett have everything a family could want, until a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down and leaves the couple drifting perilously apart. Rabbit Hole charts their bittersweet search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day.

Rabbit Hole was performed at Carthage College.

 

The Good Woman of Setzuan

Written by Bertolt Brecht 
Directed by Martin McClendon

Synopsis:

Three ancient Chinese gods come to Earth to find one good person, but Shen Te the prostitute is the only one in Setzuan who will take them in. The gods reward her with a fortune, and Shen Te’s poor relatives descend upon her, creating chaos. Suddenly her mysterious cousin Shui Ta appears and ruthlessly restores order, but Shen Te finds her troubles are only beginning. Can she survive and be good too? Playwright Bertolt Brecht’s gripping play looks at people living on the edge and the choices they must make to survive. 

The Good Woman of Setzuan was performed at Carthage College.

 

Fighting Words

Written by Sunil Kuruvilla 
Directed by Kevin Rich

Synopsis:

In 1980, boxer Johnny Owen traveled from the small mining town of Merthyr Tydfi l, Wales, to Los Angeles to challenger Lupe Pintor for the world bantamweight championship. It is the story of the women who watched the fi ght on television, while baking in Wales. As they bake a cake, readying for the gathering of women at the gym, Peg, Nia, and Mrs. Davies support and ridicule each other as they reveal their secrets and dreams. As the cake rises in the kitchen, so do the tempers as the women fi ght about who knows Johnny best, then about which one of them he loves more.

Fighting Words was performed at Carthage College.

 

Honest

Written by Academy Award Winner and Tony Nominated Writer and Director Eric Simonson 
Directed by Herschel Kruger 

Synopsis:

Writer Guy Prescott seems to have it all —youth, celebrity, and a huge advance from one of the biggest publishing houses in the country—until one day a stranger comes to his door and demands he tell him who he really is. What follows is a fascinating tale that takes us back in time, first to Guy’s heady college days, and then to a strange and traumatic family history. It’s a journey fraught with intrigue, lies, heartbreak and the ultimate hoax: self-deception.

Honest was performed at Carthage College.

 

Thoroughly Modern Millie

New Music by Jeanine Tesori 
New Lyrics by Dick Scanlan 
Book by Richard Morris and Dick Scanlan 
Directed by Neil Scharnick 
Musical Direction by Amy Haines

Synopsis:

Would-be flapper Millie Dillmont leaves Kansas and its safe, familiar drudgeries for Manhattan, determined to get a secretarial job with a rich, handsome boss she can marry. But her scheme to become “thoroughly modern” is sidetracked when she finds herself falling in love with a penniless romantic. Based on the 1967 film musical, this rollicking, unpretentious 2002 Tony winner recalls the joyful “Cinderella musicals” of the 1920s. (See Photos)

Thoroughly Modern Millie was performed at Carthage College.

 

Soaring

Choreographed by Carthage Dance Faculty 
Annie Hackett and Katie Sopoci

Synopsis:

The Department of Theatre presents the second annual dance concert featuring choreography by Carthage Dance faculty members Annie Hackett and Katie Sopoci along with Carthage student choreography. This exciting dance event has styles for all tastes including classical and contemporary ballet, jazz, modern, and hip hop. Last year more than 50 Carthage students participated in this exciting showcase.

Soaring was performed at Carthage College.

 

The Runner Stumbles

Written by Milan Stitt 
Directed by Eric Stibbe

Synopsis:

Father Rivard is a priest in a small, economically depressed coal-mining town. Working on what he thinks is a “controversial” work, he lives with the brutal lives of his poor parishioners, the old, unfriendly nuns in the nearby convent, and his own self-doubts. When Rita, an energetic and bright young sister, arrives at the parish, he finds someone he can talk to, someone with whom he has much in common.

The Runner Stumbles was performed at Carthage College.

 

To Gillian on her 37th Birthday

Written by Michael Brady 
Directed by Samantha Tink

Synopsis:

Ever since David’s wife Gillian was killed on her birthday, he has been completely incapable of accepting her death. Each day, he still a down to the beach to “talk” to her, and keep her alive in his mind. As he withdraws further into his fantasy world, he leaves his neglected daughter behind. Hoping to help him, David’s meddling in-laws bring an uninvited guest, and a hidden agenda, for a weekend at David’s beach house.

To Gillian on her 37th Birthday was performed at Carthage College.

 

Last Train to Nibroc

Written by Arlene Hutton 
Directed by Caitlin Robertson

Synopsis:

In December 1940, an east-bound cross-country train carries the bodies of the great American writers Nathanael West and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Also on board is May, who shares her seat with a charming young passenger, Raleigh. Religious and bookish, May plans to be a missionary. Raleigh has been given a medical discharge and, inspired by West and Fitzgerald, is heading to New York to be a writer.

Last Train to Nibroc was performed at Carthage College.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Quick Facts

    • Carthage is named a Best Midwestern College by The Princeton Review (2017), a designation given to only 25 percent of four-year schools.

    • Scheduled to open in fall 2018, a new residential tower will offer suite-style housing and two floors of shared campus spaces for gaming, cooking, group meetings, or quiet studying. Learn more about The Tower

    • You’re going to need brain fuel. Grab a morning coffee and a snack and Starbucks or Einstein Bros. Bagels. Later, meet friends at “The Caf,” where the specials change daily but the staples are constant, or swing through “The Stu” for wins, a burrito, or a sub. A new option, Carthage Cash, even covers some off-campus meals.

    • 96% of Carthage alumni report that they have secured a job or are continuing their studies six months after graduation. Visit Career Services.

    • 91% of employers say critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills matter more than your major when it comes to career success. Learn more about how the liberal arts prepare you for a successful career.

    • Lots of schools wear the four-year label. Carthage stands behind it. 95% of Carthage graduates earn their degrees in four years. Learn more

    • Oscars. Emmys. Tonys. Golden Globes. The playwrights we’ve brought in have them. Each year, the Carthage Theatre Department commissions an original script by a renowned playwright for its New Play Initiative. Carthage students then work with the writer to stage it. 

    • As a freshman in the highly selective Honors Program, learn how to gain expertise in anything from music to forest ecology. After that, tackle a contemporary social, economic, or political problem. If you like, you can live on an Honors-only floor of a Carthage residence hall. 

    • In 2016 and 2017, Carthage was named a top producer of Fulbright Scholars by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

    • Things look new at Carthage because they are. Our athletic and recreation center, student union, computer labs, audiovisual production suite, and numerous residence halls have all been constructed or newly renovated in the last 10 years. Our new science center caps it off.

    • Carthage offers majors, minors and concentrations in more than 50 areas of study, from archaeology to athletic training, neuroscience to music theatre.

    • Our Summer Undergraduate Research Experience offers select students a research budget, one-on-one mentoring with a professor, and 10 weeks of analyzing, deciphering — and getting paid.

    • So the lake is kind of a focal point, but there’s a lot more to love about our campus — like the fact that our 80-acre campus is also an arboretum and wildlife sanctuary. Focused on keeping campus lush forever, we plant between 50 and 75 new trees every year from a variety of species.

    • Carthage was founded in 1847. That’s more than 170 years of leaders, makers, and go-getters going out and going forth. Read more about Carthage’s rich history.

    • More than 90 percent of our students receive financial aid, a hefty chunk of which is scholarships and grants — including $1.25 million annually from the Presidential Scholarship Competition and numerous Merit Scholarships. Learn what’s available.

    • Abraham Lincoln was an early Trustee of the College, and U.S. Secretary of State John Hay was a Carthage alum. The two still have a proud place on our campus. Spend some time with them in our Sesquicentennial Plaza. On warm days you’ll find professors leading their classes here.

    • Come to Carthage; hear yourself think — think … think …
      Legend has it that Sesquicentennial Plaza holds a perfect echo. Just stand with both your feet on the “1847,” face Straz, and start talking. “You’re the only one who can hear you, but you’ll be crystal clear,” promises English and theatre alumna Mikaley Osley.

    • Our Great Lake provides Carthage students with some amazing views. Think classes on the beach, lake views from the lab, and sunrises from your dorm room. “I love waking up in the morning with the sun shining off the lake. Nothing compares to the view in the morning,” says biology and neuroscience major Ann O’Leary.

    • Carthage awards up to 30 Presidential Scholarships each year, which range from 75% tuition up to full tuition, room, and board. Learn more.

    • For a full decade, NASA has selected Carthage students to conduct research aboard its zero-gravity aircraft. Lately, the stakes have risen. A team of underclassmen is grinding to prepare a tiny but powerful Earth-imaging satellite for launch to the International Space Station. Learn more about the space sciences at Carthage

    • Carthage is the only college or university in the Midwest where every freshman takes a full-year sequence of foundational texts of the Western intellectual tradition. Learn about the Carthage core.

    • With a student-faculty ratio of 12:1, your professors will know who you are. They will also know who you want to be — and how to get you there. Meet our faculty.

    • There are more than 120 student organizations on campus, from Amnesty International to Chemistry Club, to Frisbee and Latin Belly Dancing. See how easy it is to get involved.

    • True story: There are more than 27 art galleries, a dozen museums, and nine theatres within 25 miles of Carthage. Some highlights: The nationally recognized Racine Art Museum, the world-renowned Art Institute of Chicago, and the Milwaukee Art Museum. Learn more about our location.

    • What’s better than one professor? Two professors. What’s better than two professors? Two professors from totally different fields teaching a single class. There’s debate. Discussion. Differing perspectives. This is where the magic happens. That’s why every student takes a Carthage Symposium.

    • Imagine presenting your original research at an international conference — as an undergraduate. Carthage is dedicated to undergraduate research. Learn more about current opportunities.

    • You can’t hide here — not with only 17 other students in the classroom with you. That’s going to be rough some mornings. But later, when you’re able to argue your point of view thoughtfully, express your opinions succinctly, and meet challenges head-on, without fear … Yep, you’ll thank us.

    • Carthage is ranked No. 11 in the country for student participation in short-term study abroad. Every J-Term, hundreds of students travel all over the world on faculty-led study tours. Imagine a month in Sweden, Rome, Cuba, Senegal, India, Japan …

    Previous
    Next