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Psychological Science

Faculty

David Rademacher

Assistant Professor of Psychological Science

Lentz Hall 226A

  • Biography
  • Education
  • Courses
  • Publications

David Rademacher is interested in the biological basis of drug addiction, learning and memory, and plasticity, and is developing a line of research investigating the biological basis of behavioral addictions including cell phone addiction. To date, he is co-author of 37 peer-reviewed papers and 2 review articles published in several top journals including Journal of Neuroscience, European Journal of Neuroscience, and Brain Structure and Function. He has served as principal investigator or co-investigator on several grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health.

Prof. Rademacher earned a B.A. in psychology with honors and distinction from Hamline University. He earned a M.S. and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Before coming to Carthage, he was a research assistant professor at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and a visiting assistant professor at Lake Forest College. He was the recipient of predoctoral and postdoctoral National Research Service Awards from the National Institutes of Health.

Prof. Rademacher teaches courses in experimental psychology, behavioral research statistics, history of psychology, and introduction to psychological science.

  • Ph.D. — University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • M.S. — University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • B.A. — Hamline University
  • PYC 1500 Introduction to Psychological Science
  • SSC 2330 Behavioral Research Statistics
  • PYC 2900 Experimental Psychology
  • PYC 3700 Thesis Development
  • PYC 400Q History of Psychology

Beison A, Rademacher DJ. Relationship between family history of alcohol addiction, parents’ education level, and smartphone problem use scale scores. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 6(1): 84-91, doi:10.1556/2006.6.2017.016, Mar 2017

Gebremedhin KG, Rademacher DJ. Histone H3 acetylation in the postmortem Parkinson’s disease primary motor cortex. Neuroscience Letters, 627(3): 121-125, doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.05.060, Aug 2016

Collier TJ, O’Malley J, Rademacher DJ, Stancati JA, Sisson KA, Sortwell CE, Paumier K, Gebremedin KG, Steece-Collier K. Increased survival of grafted dopamine neurons in aging rats: interrogating the target environment for integration. Neurobiology of Disease. 77: 191-203. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2015.03.005, May 2015

Rademacher DJ, Mendoza-Elias N, Meredith, GE. Effects of context-drug learning on synaptic connectivity in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala in rats. European Journal of Neuroscience. 41(2): 205-215, doi: 10.1111/ejn.12781, Jan 2015

Figge DA, Rahman I, Dougherty PJ, Rademacher DJ. Retrieval of contextual memories increases activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein in the amygdala and hippocampus. Brain Structure and Function. 218(5): 1177-1196, doi: 10.1007/s00429-012-0453-y, Sept 2013

Zhang Y, Meredith GE, Mendoza-Elias N, Rademacher DJ, Tseng, K-Y, Steece-Collier K. Aberrant restoration of spines and their synapses in L-dopa-induced dyskinesia: involvement of corticostriatal but not thalamostriatal synapses. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(28):11655-11667, doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0288-13.2013, Jul 2013

Levine ND, Rademacher DJ, Collier TJ, O’Malley JA, Kells AP, San Sebastian W, Bankiewicz KS, Steece-Collier K. Advances in thin tissue Golgi-Cox impregnation: rapid, reliable methods for multi-assay analyses in rodent and non-human primate brain. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 213 (2): 214-227, doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2012.12.001. Mar 2013

Steece-Collier K, Rademacher DJ, Soderstrom K. Anatomy of graft-induced dyskinesias: circuit remodeling in the parkinsonian striatum. Basal Ganglia, 2 (1): 15-30, Mar 2012

Hetzel A, Meredith GE, Rademacher DJ, Rosenkranz JA. Effect of amphetamine place conditioning on excitatory synaptic events in the basolateral amygdala ex vivo. Neuroscience, 206: 7-16, doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2012.01.015. Mar 2012

Meredith GE, Rademacher DJ. MPTP mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, 1 (1): 19-33, June 2011

Rademacher DJ, Rosenkranz JA, Morshedi MM, Sullivan EM, Meredith GE. Amphetamine-associated contextual learning is accompanied by structural and functional plasticity in the basolateral amygdala. Journal of Neuroscience, 30 (13): 4676-4686, doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6165-09.2010, Mar 2010

Rademacher DJ, Sullivan EM, Figge DA. The effects of infusions of CART 55-102 into the basolateral amygdala on amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats. Psychopharmacology, 208 (3): 499-509, doi: 10.1007/s00213-009-1748-4, Feb 2010

Morshedi MM, Rademacher DJ, Meredith GE. Increased synapses in the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with repeated amphetamine administration. Synapse, 63(2): 126-135, doi: 10.1002/syn.20591, Feb 2009

Rademacher DJ, Meier SE, Shi L, Ho W-SV, Jarrahian A, Hillard CJ. Effects of acute and repeated restraint stress on endocannabinoid content in the amygdala, ventral striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex in mice. Neuropharmacology (Special Issue: Cannabinoid Signaling in the Nervous System), 54(1): 108-116, Jan 2008

Rademacher DJ, Napier TC, Meredith GE. Context modulates the expression of amphetamine motor sensitization, cellular activation, and synaptophysin immunoreactivity. European Journal of Neuroscience. 26(9): 2661-2668, Nov 2007

Rademacher DJ, Hillard CJ. Interactions between endocannabinoids and stress-induced decreased sensitivity to natural reward. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. 31 (3): 633-641, Apr 2007

Rademacher DJ, Kovacs B, Shen F, Napier TC, Meredith GE. The neural substrates of amphetamine conditioned place preference: implications for the formation of conditioned stimulus-reward associations. European Journal of Neuroscience. 24(7): 2089-2097, Oct 2006

Rademacher DJ, Patel S, Ho W-SV, Savoie AM, Rusch NJ, Gauthier KM, Hillard CJ. U-46619 but not serotonin increases endocannabinoid content in the middle cerebral artery: evidence for functional relevance. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 288(6): H2694-H2701, June 2005

Hill MN, Patel S, Carrier EJ, Rademacher DJ, Ormerod BK, Hillard CJ, Gorzalka BB. Downregulation of endocannabinoid signaling in the hippocampus following chronic unpredictable stress. Neuropsychopharmacology. 30(3): 508-515, Mar 2005

Patel S, Roelke CT, Rademacher DJ, Hillard CJ. Inhibition of restraint stress-induced neural and behavioural activation by endogenous cannabinoid signalling. European Journal of Neuroscience. 21(4): 1057-1069, Feb 2005

Patel S, Carrier EJ, Ho W-SV, Rademacher DJ, Cunningham S, Sudarshan Reddy D, Falck JR, Hillard CJ. The postmortal accumulation of brain N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) is dependent upon fatty acid amide hydrolase activity. Journal of Lipid Research. 46(2): 342-349, Feb 2005

Rademacher DJ, Weber DN, Hillard CJ. Waterborne lead exposure affects brain endocannabinoid content in male but not female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). NeuroToxicology. 26(1): 9-15, Jan 2005

Muthian S, Rademacher DJ, Roelke CT, Gross GJ, Hillard CJ. Anandamide content is increased and CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade is protective during transient, focal cerebral ischemia. Neuroscience. 129 (3): 743-750, Dec 2004

Patel S, Roelke CT, Rademacher DJ, Cullinan WE, Hillard CJ. Endocannabinoid signaling negatively modulates stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Endocrinology. 145 (12): 5431-5438, Dec 2004

Rademacher DJ, Nithipatikom K, Campbell WB, Hillard CJ, Kearn CS, Carrier EJ, Patel S, Pfister SL. Production of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and prostaglandins by a novel rat microglial cell line. Journal of Neuroimmunology. 149(1-2): 130-141, Apr 2004

Seagard JL, Dean C, Patel S, Rademacher DJ, Hopp FA, Schmeling WT, Hillard CJ. Anandamide content and interaction of endocannabinoid/GABA modulatory effects in the NTS on baroreflex-evoked sympathoinhibition. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 286(3): H992-H1000, Mar 2004

Patel S, Rademacher DJ, Hillard CJ. Differential regulation of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol within the limbic forebrain by dopamine receptor activity. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 306(3): 880-888, Sep 2003

Patel S, Hillard CJ, Wohlfeil ER, Rademacher DJ, Carrier EJ, Perry LJ, Kundu A, Campbell WB. The general anesthetic propofol increases brain N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) content and inhibits fatty acid amide hydrolase. British Journal of Pharmacology. 139(5): 1005-1013, Jul 2003

Rademacher DJ, Patel S, Hopp FA, Dean C, Hillard CJ, Seagard JL. Microinjection of a cannabinoid receptor antagonist into the NTS increases baroreflex duration in dogs. American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 284(5): H1570-H1576, May 2003

Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE, Weber DN. Effects of dietary lead and/or dimercaptosuccinic acid exposure on regional serotonin and serotonin metabolite content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Neuroscience Letters. 339(2): 156-160, Mar 2003

Rademacher DJ, Schuyler AL, Kruschel CK, Steinpreis RE. Effects of cocaine and putative atypical antipsychotics on rat social an ethopharmacological study. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 73(4): 769-778, Nov 2002

Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE. Effects of the selective mu(1)-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxonazine, on cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor behavior in rats. Neuroscience Letters. 332(3): 159-162, Nov 2002

Rademacher DJ, Anderson AP, Steinpreis RE. Acute effects of amperozide and paroxetine on social cohesion in male conspecifics. Brain Research Bulletin. 58(2): 187-191, Jun 2002

Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE, Weber DN. Short-term exposure to dietary Pb and/or DMSA affects dopamine and dopamine metabolite levels in the medulla, optic tectum, and cerebellum of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 70(2-3): 199-207, Oct-Nov 2001

Rademacher DJ, Anders KA, Thompson KJ, Steinpreis RE. The failure of some rats to acquire intravenous cocaine self-administration is attributable to conditioned place aversion. Behavioural Brain Research. 117(1-2): 13-19, Dec 2000

Rademacher DJ, Anders KA, Riley MG, Nesbitt JT, Steinpreis RE. Determination of the place conditioning and locomotor effects of amperozide in rats: a comparison with cocaine. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology (Special Issue: Decade of Behavior). 8(3): 434-443, Aug 2000

Zhou T, Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE, Weis JS. Neurotransmitter levels in two populations of larval Fundulus heteroclitus after methylmercury exposure. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. C: Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Endocrinology. 124(3): 287-294, Nov 1999

Panos JJ, Rademacher DJ, Renner SL, Steinpreis RE. The rewarding properties of NMDA and MK-801 (dizocilpine) as indexed by the conditioned place preference paradigm. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 64(3): 591-595, Nov 1999

Rademacher DJ, Kuppinger HE, Thompson KJ, Harrington A, Kaczmarek HJ, Kopish AJ, Steinpreis RE. The effects of amperozide on cocaine-induced social withdrawal in rats. Behavioural Brain Research. 99(1): 75-80, Feb 1999

David Rademacher

David Rademacher is interested in the biological basis of drug addiction, learning and memory, and plasticity, and is developing a line of research investigating the biological basis of behavioral addictions including cell phone addiction. To date, he is co-author of 37 peer-reviewed papers and 2 review articles published in several top journals including Journal of Neuroscience, European Journal of Neuroscience, and Brain Structure and Function. He has served as principal investigator or co-investigator on several grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health.

Prof. Rademacher earned a B.A. in psychology with honors and distinction from Hamline University. He earned a M.S. and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Before coming to Carthage, he was a research assistant professor at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and a visiting assistant professor at Lake Forest College. He was the recipient of predoctoral and postdoctoral National Research Service Awards from the National Institutes of Health.

Prof. Rademacher teaches courses in experimental psychology, behavioral research statistics, history of psychology, and introduction to psychological science.

Brief Bio

David Rademacher is interested in the biological basis of drug addiction, learning and memory, and plasticity, and is developing a line of research investigating the biological basis of behavioral addictions including cell phone addiction. To date, he is co-author of 37 peer-reviewed papers and 2 review articles published in several top journals including Journal of Neuroscience, European Journal of Neuroscience, and Brain Structure and Function.

Title

Assistant Professor of Psychological Science

Email Address

drademacher@carthage.edu

Phone Number

262-551-5840

Office Location

Lentz Hall 226A

Education

  • Ph.D. — University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • M.S. — University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • B.A. — Hamline University

Courses

  • PYC 1500 Introduction to Psychological Science
  • SSC 2330 Behavioral Research Statistics
  • PYC 2900 Experimental Psychology
  • PYC 3700 Thesis Development
  • PYC 400Q History of Psychology

Publications

Beison A, Rademacher DJ. Relationship between family history of alcohol addiction, parents’ education level, and smartphone problem use scale scores. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 6(1): 84-91, doi:10.1556/2006.6.2017.016, Mar 2017

Gebremedhin KG, Rademacher DJ. Histone H3 acetylation in the postmortem Parkinson’s disease primary motor cortex. Neuroscience Letters, 627(3): 121-125, doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.05.060, Aug 2016

Collier TJ, O’Malley J, Rademacher DJ, Stancati JA, Sisson KA, Sortwell CE, Paumier K, Gebremedin KG, Steece-Collier K. Increased survival of grafted dopamine neurons in aging rats: interrogating the target environment for integration. Neurobiology of Disease. 77: 191-203. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2015.03.005, May 2015

Rademacher DJ, Mendoza-Elias N, Meredith, GE. Effects of context-drug learning on synaptic connectivity in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala in rats. European Journal of Neuroscience. 41(2): 205-215, doi: 10.1111/ejn.12781, Jan 2015

Figge DA, Rahman I, Dougherty PJ, Rademacher DJ. Retrieval of contextual memories increases activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein in the amygdala and hippocampus. Brain Structure and Function. 218(5): 1177-1196, doi: 10.1007/s00429-012-0453-y, Sept 2013

Zhang Y, Meredith GE, Mendoza-Elias N, Rademacher DJ, Tseng, K-Y, Steece-Collier K. Aberrant restoration of spines and their synapses in L-dopa-induced dyskinesia: involvement of corticostriatal but not thalamostriatal synapses. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(28):11655-11667, doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0288-13.2013, Jul 2013

Levine ND, Rademacher DJ, Collier TJ, O’Malley JA, Kells AP, San Sebastian W, Bankiewicz KS, Steece-Collier K. Advances in thin tissue Golgi-Cox impregnation: rapid, reliable methods for multi-assay analyses in rodent and non-human primate brain. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 213 (2): 214-227, doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2012.12.001. Mar 2013

Steece-Collier K, Rademacher DJ, Soderstrom K. Anatomy of graft-induced dyskinesias: circuit remodeling in the parkinsonian striatum. Basal Ganglia, 2 (1): 15-30, Mar 2012

Hetzel A, Meredith GE, Rademacher DJ, Rosenkranz JA. Effect of amphetamine place conditioning on excitatory synaptic events in the basolateral amygdala ex vivo. Neuroscience, 206: 7-16, doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2012.01.015. Mar 2012

Meredith GE, Rademacher DJ. MPTP mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, 1 (1): 19-33, June 2011

Rademacher DJ, Rosenkranz JA, Morshedi MM, Sullivan EM, Meredith GE. Amphetamine-associated contextual learning is accompanied by structural and functional plasticity in the basolateral amygdala. Journal of Neuroscience, 30 (13): 4676-4686, doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6165-09.2010, Mar 2010

Rademacher DJ, Sullivan EM, Figge DA. The effects of infusions of CART 55-102 into the basolateral amygdala on amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats. Psychopharmacology, 208 (3): 499-509, doi: 10.1007/s00213-009-1748-4, Feb 2010

Morshedi MM, Rademacher DJ, Meredith GE. Increased synapses in the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with repeated amphetamine administration. Synapse, 63(2): 126-135, doi: 10.1002/syn.20591, Feb 2009

Rademacher DJ, Meier SE, Shi L, Ho W-SV, Jarrahian A, Hillard CJ. Effects of acute and repeated restraint stress on endocannabinoid content in the amygdala, ventral striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex in mice. Neuropharmacology (Special Issue: Cannabinoid Signaling in the Nervous System), 54(1): 108-116, Jan 2008

Rademacher DJ, Napier TC, Meredith GE. Context modulates the expression of amphetamine motor sensitization, cellular activation, and synaptophysin immunoreactivity. European Journal of Neuroscience. 26(9): 2661-2668, Nov 2007

Rademacher DJ, Hillard CJ. Interactions between endocannabinoids and stress-induced decreased sensitivity to natural reward. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. 31 (3): 633-641, Apr 2007

Rademacher DJ, Kovacs B, Shen F, Napier TC, Meredith GE. The neural substrates of amphetamine conditioned place preference: implications for the formation of conditioned stimulus-reward associations. European Journal of Neuroscience. 24(7): 2089-2097, Oct 2006

Rademacher DJ, Patel S, Ho W-SV, Savoie AM, Rusch NJ, Gauthier KM, Hillard CJ. U-46619 but not serotonin increases endocannabinoid content in the middle cerebral artery: evidence for functional relevance. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 288(6): H2694-H2701, June 2005

Hill MN, Patel S, Carrier EJ, Rademacher DJ, Ormerod BK, Hillard CJ, Gorzalka BB. Downregulation of endocannabinoid signaling in the hippocampus following chronic unpredictable stress. Neuropsychopharmacology. 30(3): 508-515, Mar 2005

Patel S, Roelke CT, Rademacher DJ, Hillard CJ. Inhibition of restraint stress-induced neural and behavioural activation by endogenous cannabinoid signalling. European Journal of Neuroscience. 21(4): 1057-1069, Feb 2005

Patel S, Carrier EJ, Ho W-SV, Rademacher DJ, Cunningham S, Sudarshan Reddy D, Falck JR, Hillard CJ. The postmortal accumulation of brain N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) is dependent upon fatty acid amide hydrolase activity. Journal of Lipid Research. 46(2): 342-349, Feb 2005

Rademacher DJ, Weber DN, Hillard CJ. Waterborne lead exposure affects brain endocannabinoid content in male but not female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). NeuroToxicology. 26(1): 9-15, Jan 2005

Muthian S, Rademacher DJ, Roelke CT, Gross GJ, Hillard CJ. Anandamide content is increased and CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade is protective during transient, focal cerebral ischemia. Neuroscience. 129 (3): 743-750, Dec 2004

Patel S, Roelke CT, Rademacher DJ, Cullinan WE, Hillard CJ. Endocannabinoid signaling negatively modulates stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Endocrinology. 145 (12): 5431-5438, Dec 2004

Rademacher DJ, Nithipatikom K, Campbell WB, Hillard CJ, Kearn CS, Carrier EJ, Patel S, Pfister SL. Production of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and prostaglandins by a novel rat microglial cell line. Journal of Neuroimmunology. 149(1-2): 130-141, Apr 2004

Seagard JL, Dean C, Patel S, Rademacher DJ, Hopp FA, Schmeling WT, Hillard CJ. Anandamide content and interaction of endocannabinoid/GABA modulatory effects in the NTS on baroreflex-evoked sympathoinhibition. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 286(3): H992-H1000, Mar 2004

Patel S, Rademacher DJ, Hillard CJ. Differential regulation of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol within the limbic forebrain by dopamine receptor activity. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 306(3): 880-888, Sep 2003

Patel S, Hillard CJ, Wohlfeil ER, Rademacher DJ, Carrier EJ, Perry LJ, Kundu A, Campbell WB. The general anesthetic propofol increases brain N-arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) content and inhibits fatty acid amide hydrolase. British Journal of Pharmacology. 139(5): 1005-1013, Jul 2003

Rademacher DJ, Patel S, Hopp FA, Dean C, Hillard CJ, Seagard JL. Microinjection of a cannabinoid receptor antagonist into the NTS increases baroreflex duration in dogs. American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 284(5): H1570-H1576, May 2003

Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE, Weber DN. Effects of dietary lead and/or dimercaptosuccinic acid exposure on regional serotonin and serotonin metabolite content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Neuroscience Letters. 339(2): 156-160, Mar 2003

Rademacher DJ, Schuyler AL, Kruschel CK, Steinpreis RE. Effects of cocaine and putative atypical antipsychotics on rat social an ethopharmacological study. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 73(4): 769-778, Nov 2002

Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE. Effects of the selective mu(1)-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxonazine, on cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor behavior in rats. Neuroscience Letters. 332(3): 159-162, Nov 2002

Rademacher DJ, Anderson AP, Steinpreis RE. Acute effects of amperozide and paroxetine on social cohesion in male conspecifics. Brain Research Bulletin. 58(2): 187-191, Jun 2002

Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE, Weber DN. Short-term exposure to dietary Pb and/or DMSA affects dopamine and dopamine metabolite levels in the medulla, optic tectum, and cerebellum of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 70(2-3): 199-207, Oct-Nov 2001

Rademacher DJ, Anders KA, Thompson KJ, Steinpreis RE. The failure of some rats to acquire intravenous cocaine self-administration is attributable to conditioned place aversion. Behavioural Brain Research. 117(1-2): 13-19, Dec 2000

Rademacher DJ, Anders KA, Riley MG, Nesbitt JT, Steinpreis RE. Determination of the place conditioning and locomotor effects of amperozide in rats: a comparison with cocaine. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology (Special Issue: Decade of Behavior). 8(3): 434-443, Aug 2000

Zhou T, Rademacher DJ, Steinpreis RE, Weis JS. Neurotransmitter levels in two populations of larval Fundulus heteroclitus after methylmercury exposure. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. C: Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Endocrinology. 124(3): 287-294, Nov 1999

Panos JJ, Rademacher DJ, Renner SL, Steinpreis RE. The rewarding properties of NMDA and MK-801 (dizocilpine) as indexed by the conditioned place preference paradigm. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 64(3): 591-595, Nov 1999

Rademacher DJ, Kuppinger HE, Thompson KJ, Harrington A, Kaczmarek HJ, Kopish AJ, Steinpreis RE. The effects of amperozide on cocaine-induced social withdrawal in rats. Behavioural Brain Research. 99(1): 75-80, Feb 1999

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