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International Political Economy

Courses

Students studying IPE at Carthage will take courses in international relations, international trade and finance, international management, microeconomics, macroeconomics, political science, statistics, law, accounting and geography. Students take courses in EconomicsGeography & Earth SciencePolitical ScienceBusiness AdministrationSocial Science and Modern Languages. Scroll down to read descriptions of the IPE courses offered at Carthage, or click on the following links for additional resources.

 

Economics Courses

ECN 1030
Issues in Economics (SOC)
4 credits

This course offers students an introduction to economics, along with some elementary tools of economic analysis, with emphasis upon their application to contemporary problems and issues. The economy and selected issues are examined in their global context. Designed to meet the needs and interests of students in various majors outside of the economics and business administration areas, the course is not open to students who have received credit for either Economics 1010 or Economics 1020. Fall.

ECN 2340
Applied Statistics for Economics and Management (MTH)
4 credits

The application of statistics to problems in business and economics, encompassing the gathering, organization, analysis, and presentation of data. Topics include descriptive statistics in tabular and graphical forms; the common measures of central tendency and dispersion; sampling and probability distributions; construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; and correlation analysis. This course is offered as BUS 2340 or ECN 2340

Prerequisite: Math 1070 or equivalent. Fall/Spring.

ECN 2510
Intermediate Microeconomics (SOC)
4 credits

The economic theory of microeconomic units: consumers, firms, and industries. This entails the study of production, cost, and price theory, and the practices of firms under alternative market structures. Concepts of social welfare will be explored, and the uses and limits of public policy in addressing the problems of market failures will be examined.

Prerequisite: ECN 1010 or 1030. Fall.

ECN 2520
Intermediate Macroeconomics (SOC)
4 credits

The economic theory of macroeconomic aggregates: national income accounting; the determinants of output, income, and employment levels; the analysis of inflation; processes of economic growth; and open-economy macroeconomics. Monetary, fiscal, and incomes policies are examined and the uses and limits of these tools in promoting macroeconomic goals are discussed.

Prerequisite: ECN 1020 or 1030. Spring.

ECN 3270
International Trade (SOC)
4 credits

An historical and theoretical analysis of international economic relations in both public and private spheres. Using the principles of economic analysis, models of international trade and factor prices, commercial policy, economic integration, balance of payments adjustment and foreign exchange markets are set forth and become a basis for examining policy issues.

Prerequisite: ECN 1010 and 1020, or 1030. Fall.

ECN 3290
International Finance
4 credits

This course examines the monetary side of international economics and globalization, including the current and historical structure of international finance institutions. Topics include exchange rate theories, monetary regimes, interest rates, asset pricing, and risk diversification, the balance of payments, currency crises, and open-economy aspects of fiscal and monetary policies. Emphasis is given to the use of theories in understanding current events and policy issues.

Prerequisite: ECN 1010 and 1020, or ECN 1030. Spring

ECN 3300
Law and Economics (SOC)
4 credits

An examination of how economic concepts and modeling can be applied to help determine the justification for, and the effects of, various types of laws and contractual arrangements. The problems posed by externalities and other market failure arising in resource, labor, and product markets are discussed, and the legal framework and regulatory environment for addressing these issues is surveyed in order that alternative approaches might be evaluated.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

ECN 4030
International Political Economy (SOC)
4 credits

Building upon prior analysis of international trade and finance, this course offers students an advanced study of the interaction of the economic and political processes in the world arena. Topics may include, but are not limited to, economic and political integration, theories of direct foreign investment and international production, economic development, the political economy of the global environment and international governance. Spring.

ECN 4050
Seminar in International Political Economy
4 credits

Serving as a capstone for the international political economy major, the seminar goes beyond disciplinary lines in an attempt to further integrate diverse and often competing perspectives, methodologies, and values. A research thesis, on a topic of individual student’s choice made in consultation with an advisor, is required along with an oral presentation to faculty and students involved in the program.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Spring.

Political Science Courses 

POL 1050
Introduction to International Relations
4 credits

This course offers an introduction to the major concepts and theories in international politics and their application to the events of the postwar world, particularly the Cold War and the North-South conflict. Attention is also given to disruptive forces in the international community, such as the nuclear arms race and ethnic conflict, as well as those forces, such as the United Nations, that contribute to world order.Fall.

POL 200T
Topics in Political Science
1-4 credits

This course covers selected topics such as jurisprudence, international law, women and politics, U.S. foreign policy in Central America, art and politics, politics of developing areas, political socialization, the Presidency, criminal justice and internal security. The course content will determine in which area credit will be given.

POL 2050
Philosophical Foundations of Political Economy
4 credits

An introduction to the philosophical foundations of political economy from classical times through the Enlightenment and to the modern era. Students will read, discuss, and analyze the works of both European political economists (Smith, Ricardo, Mill, and Marx) and American thinkers and statesmen in the field (Jefferson, Mason, Hamilton, and Madison). Fall

POL 4050
Seminar in International Political Economy
4 credits

Serving as a capstone for the International Political Economy major, the seminar goes beyond disciplinary lines in an attempt to further integrate diverse and often competing perspectives, methodologies, and values. A research thesis, on a topic of the individual student’s choice made in consultation with an advisor, is required along with an oral presentation to faculty and students involved in the program.Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Business Administration Courses

MGT 3710
International Management
4 credits

A study of management in an international environment, its evolution, and its position in today’s society. Students also study the control and decision-making process for management of a worldwide organization, including the financial, marketing, human resource, political and ethical implications of the worldwide organization in local markets and in the international community.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Spring.

MGT 3730
International Legal Environment of Business
4 credits

A survey of various legal systems including common law, civil law, and Islamic law. Students will be introduced to a variety of concepts, including the sources of international law, the distinction between private and public law, and the concept of sovereign nations. The implications of sovereignty as they relate to international business activity are a central theme of the course. Original source materials, case studies, and legal opinions are used. Special schedule.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Modern Language Courses

FRN 3080
The French-Speaking World: Social, Political, and Economic Issues
4 credits

Students will learn about social, political, and economic issues affecting the French-speaking world using a variety of media and texts. Issues will be contextualized in the contemporary world, and examination of their historical background will further students’ understanding of these issues in their cultural context.

Prerequisite: French 3010 or consent of instructor. Alternate Fall Semesters.

GRM 3080
The German-Speaking World: Social, Political, and Economic Issues
4 credits

Students will learn about social, political, and economic issues affecting the German-speaking world using a variety of media and texts. Issues will be discussed within the context of the contemporary world, and examination of their historical background will further students’ understanding of these issues in their cultural context.

Prerequisite: German 3010 or consent of instructor. Alternative Fall Semesters.

SPN 3080
The Spanish-Speaking World: Social, Political, and Economic Issues
4 credits

Students will learn about social, political, and economic issues affecting the Spanish-speaking world using a variety of media and texts. Issues will be discussed within the context of the contemporary world, and examination of the historical background will further students’ understanding of these issues in their cultural context.

Prerequisite: Spanish 3010 or consent of instructor

Social Science Courses

SSC 2330
Behavioral Research Statistics
4 credits

A beginning course in statistical concepts and procedures needed for critically evaluating and conducting research in psychology, sociology, political science and other behavioral sciences.Prerequisite: PYC 1500 or permission of instructor. Fall/Spring.

Geography Courses

GEO 1500
Human Geography: An Introduction (SOC)
4 credits

An examination of the evolution of concepts concerning the nature, scope, and methods of Human Geography (population, economic, urban, landscape, etc.) with emphasis on current geographic thought, theory, research themes, and the relationship between people and the environment. Alternate Springs

GEO 1600
Earth Revealed (NLAB)
4 credits

Earth Revealed examines the earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere, studying the spatial patterns of phenomena at a variety of scales. The course is taught in a studio classroom setting, with lecture/discussion and computer-based analysis of satellite imagery. Environmental issues and sustainability are an integral part of the class. Fall/Spring 

GEO 1610
Introduction to Geographic Information Science: Mapping Your World
4 credits

This course provides an introduction to portraying spatial data and making data maps for a variety of applications. Students work in a hands-on lab/lecture setting while exploring computer mapping production techniques; cartographic design; communication properties of thematic maps; data selection and quality; and the problems of graphic display in print and electronic formats. Students will apply the course material by completing a variety of mapping projects. Students need no specialized computer skills to enter the course, but they will be expected to manipulate data and maps using the computer methods discussed in class. Fall/Spring

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