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College Catalog

Art

Courses

  • ARH 1700

    Introduction to Art History (FAR)

    4cr
    This introductory art history course provides an intense chronological overview of artistic conventions from prehistoric cave painting to the 20th century. Students investigate not only what elements comprise a particular style, but also why and how artistic expression has been shaped, by social, political, cultural, religious, and individual forces.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ARH 2100

    History of Photography: Daguerre to Digital (FAR)

    4cr This course introduces the history of photography from its experimental beginnings in the early 19th century to the digital practices of the present. The course focuses on the various social, cultural, scientific, and artistic uses of photography as a visual medium, as well as the broader themes and questions that have accompanied photography throughout its history.

  • ARH 2700

    Art Survey I: Paleolithic to Medieval (FAR)

    4cr An introduction to the history of the Western tradition of art, from the Paleolithic through late medieval. This course is offered every fall. Prerequisite: None Fall

  • ARH 2701

    Art Survey II: Renaissance to Contemporary (FAR)

    4cr An introduction to the history of the Western tradition of art, from the early Renaissance through contemporary art. This course is offered every spring. Prerequisite: None Spring

  • ARH 2710

    Arts of the Americas (FAR)

    4 cr
    An introduction to the indigenous art traditions of the Americas. This includes the Aztec, Maya, Inca, Amazon, and North American Indian traditions. The course content is primarily visual but will necessarily consider the historical, archaeological, social, and religious contexts of the works. The course will be of special interest to students studying history, religion, or Latin American culture. It is a dramatic and fabulously rich body of works that is a world apart from the Western European tradition, but as close to home as the dirt under our feet.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall

  • ARH 3150

    Women in the Literary and Visual Arts (FAR)

    4cr
    While doing library research on "women" for her guest lecture at Newnham and Girton colleges in 1928, the disconcerted Virginia Woolf learned that "it was impossible for any woman, past, present, or to come, to have the genius of Shakespeare . . . Cats do not go to heaven. Women cannot write the plays of Shakespeare." Women in the Visual and Literary Arts takes up that famous feminist's concern: WHY have there been no famous women artists? HAVE there been none? Now Women in the Visual and Literary Arts investigates women's artistic work alongside those cultural forces that have shaped it. The course begins by establishing the historical context for women's artistic expression. This includes the major events defining the moment in history and the material conditions that characterize it. Also included with each period will be some of those major voices that have achieved canonical status, as well as those women artists, writers, and performers who have been omitted from history.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 3155

    Women in the Visual and Performing Arts (FAR)

    4cr
    Have there been any great women artists? Have there been ANY at all? This interdisciplinary Art History Music Womens and Gender Studies course examines artifactual evidence to discover not only those women and their activities that have fallen from historical record, but also to discover just what women have been doing from eight in the morning until eight at night, what historical conditions have shaped their activities, and what roles they have played as art and music makers, patrons, muses, and subjects consider Vinnie Ream Hoxie, our own Madison teenager who sculpted the famous Lincoln statue in the U.S. Capitol!
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 3700

    Research Methods in Art History

    4cr
    An introduction to resources and methods of research in art history. The class gives an overview of types of evidence, methods of scholarship, and the discipline's historiography. A case study in a single area will be the focus for practical exercises in research and writing. Available to art history majors only.
    Prerequisites: ARH 2700 and ARH 2701

  • ARH 3710

    20th Century American Art (FAR)

    4cr
    This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the artistic, sociopolitical, philosophical, psychological, and spiritual forces that forged a distinctly American art in that century when the United States rose to prominence on the world stage. Students will be introduced to the language and methodologies of art, and they will engage with American art's quest for identity from its Gilded Age Eurocentric aspirations, through industry-driven modernism and Depression-era regionalism, to Cold War American heroes like Pollock, and 60s superstars like Warhol. Our study will examine American art's role in the age of information, pluralism, and diversity, and conclude with America's postmodern identity crisis.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 3720

    Arts of Africa (FAR)

    4cr
    An introduction to the art traditions of Africa through the study of selected works. Ten thousand years of African art will be explored, up to and including the African diaspora.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 3730

    Masterpieces of Asian Art and Architecture (FAR)

    4cr
    Introduction to the art traditions and cultures of China, Japan, Korea, South and Southeast Asia, and the Near East through the study of selected works and their context. Special emphasis on art and architecture related to major religious and philosophic traditions including Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. Aesthetic systems will be explored in relation to key monuments.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall

  • ARH 3740

    Rupture, Shatter, Break: Modern Art (FAR)

    4cr
    Modern Art focuses on the arts of the 20th and 21st centuries, allowing students to engage with the artistic experimentation of their own era. This study of the arts, beginning with our Age of Anxiety, traces the competing and often rebellious styles of the Post Impressionists up through the Post Modernists. The course stimulates students to grapple with the question: What is art?
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 3750

    Ancient Art (FAR)

    4cr
    Ancient art concentrates on the arts of prehistoric, preliterate, and ancient peoples, ending with the arts of the Romans to close the classical tradition. The course will be of interest to any student intrigued by the dynamic relationship between art, magic, ritual, myth, science, religion, and philosophy.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 3760

    Women in the Arts (FAR)

    4cr
    WHY have there been no great women artists? HAVE there been none? Prepare to be amazed! This course takes up Nochlin's famous question by examining artifacts from prehistory and surveying evidence of women's roles and creativity in the arts up through the present.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ARH 4700

    Senior Seminar in Art History

    4cr
    Senior Seminar provides the art history major with an opportunity to design and pursue a substantial research project in the field. Intensive independent work is required, culminating in a major paper and formal presentation.
    Prerequisites: ARH 2700, ARH 2701, and ARH 3700

  • ART 1030

    Exploring Studio Art (FAR)

    4cr
    A study of design as the structural and unifying basis of the visual arts. Analysis of the elements of design and their use in solving two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems. Introduction to various media and techniques used in making art. A studio course containing theory and practice.
    Fulfills the fine art requirement for non-art majors only.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 1050

    Crafts (FAR)

    4cr
    Introductory analysis of the history and practice of various crafts. The course will focus on such areas as art metal, glass fusion, paper, fiber, and batik, depending on content in given terms.
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 1070

    Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design (FAR)

    4cr
    Application of design studies to drawing, painting, and printmaking. A studio art course containing theory and practice. Students are taught an awareness of elemental design factors involved in creating various types of images and investigate individual ways in which to express these factors.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 1071

    Introduction to Three- Dimensional Design (FAR)

    4cr
    This studio course introduces the formal elements and principles of design as they apply to three-dimensional space. Focusing on volume, structure, and spatial organization, this course develops the visualization and problem-solving skills necessary for working in three dimensions. Students explore and experiment with a variety of traditional and nontraditional media. In addition, students are exposed to great artists and artwork throughout history, critique, and art theory of three-dimensional design including sculpture, landscape, and architecture.
    Prerequisite: none
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2000

    Drawing I (FAR)

    4cr
    This foundations studio course introduces students to basic drawing techniques and media. Focusing on observational drawing, students learn to create naturalistic images and the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional page. In addition, students are exposed to great artists and drawings through history, critique, and art theory.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2110

    Darkroom Photography (FAR)

    4cr
    This course focuses on the camera as a tool of expression and photography as a basic art form. Darkroom techniques will be taught, and each student will acquire the compositional and technical skills necessary to create original photographs. Students are required to have their own cameras.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2210

    Oil Painting (FAR)

    4cr
    A beginning course in oil painting with emphasis on developing skills and techniques particular to the oil paint medium. Color theory and inventive compositional strategies based on the study of traditional and contemporary painters will be investigated. Individual attention will be given to discovery of personal artistic voice in the medium. Paintings will be based on both direct observation and the imagination. Oil painting is a studio course containing lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and theory.

  • ART 2220

    Acrylic Painting (FAR)

    4cr
    A beginning course in acrylic painting with emphasis on developing skills and techniques particular to the acrylic paint medium. Color theory and inventive compositional strategies based on study of modern and contemporary painters will be investigated. Individual attention will be given to discovery of personal artistic voice in the medium. Paintings will be based on both direct observation and the imagination. Acrylic painting is a beginning studio course containing lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and theory.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ART 2230

    Watercolor Painting (FAR)

    4cr
    A beginning course in watercolor painting with emphasis on developing skills and techniques particular to the watercolor medium. Color theory, particularly as it relates to watercolor, will be introduced. Trasparency, granularity, and permanence will be discussed as well as various watercolor mediums. Individual attention will be given to discovery of personal artistic voice in the medium. Paintings will be based on both direct observation and the imagination. Watercolor Painting is a studio course containing lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and theory.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ART 2300

    Printmaking: Silkscreen (FAR)

    4cr
    This studio course introduces the theory, practice, and history of silkscreen printmaking. Direct stencil production, resist methods, and photographic methods will be studied. Students will be encouraged to engage the printmaking process as a means of discovery as they learn to master traditional practices.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ART 2310

    Printmaking: Lithography (FAR)

    4cr
    This studio course introduces the theory, practice, and history of lithography as a fine art printmaking medium. Traditional stone lithography and more recent paper plate processes will be studied. Students will be encouraged to engage the printmaking process as a means of discovery as they learn to master traditional practices.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ART 2320

    Printmaking: Intaglio (FAR)

    4cr
    This studio course introduces the theory, practice, and history of intaglio printmaking. Etching, engraving, drypoint, and mezzotint will be covered. Students will be encouraged to engage the printmaking process as a means of discovery as they learn to master traditional practices.

  • ART 2330

    Printmaking: Relief (FAR)

    4cr
    This studio course introduces the theory, practice, and history of relief printmaking. Traditional woodcut and wood engraving as well as linoleum, collagraph, and new materials will be explored. Students will be encouraged to engage the printmaking process as a means of discovery as they learn to master traditional practices.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ART 2400

    Introduction to Sculpture (FAR)

    4cr
    This studio course explores traditional and contemporary sculpture materials and processes. Emphasis is on both additive and subtractive methods of working. Goals include acquiring technical skills, understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials, and learning safe, appropriate use of tools. Students can anticipate working with wood, clay, stone, metal, and other materials.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2500

    Ceramic Hand-Building (FAR)

    4cr
    Introduction to ceramic hand-building techniques, ceramic sculpture, and basic ceramic processes including clay and glaze formulation and kiln firing.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2510

    Ceramic Wheel-Throwing (FAR)

    4cr
    Introduction to ceramic wheel-throwing techniques, functional pottery, sculpture, and basic ceramic processes including clay and glaze formulation and kiln firing.
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2520

    Ceramic Tile (FAR)

    4cr
    The objective of this course is to develop technical and conceptual skills for ceramic tile and brick making using fundamental hand-building and mold-making techniques. All projects have historical and/or conceptual components and require research, planning, development of ideas, and good craftsmanship. Formal, historical, and conceptual components of architectural ceramics will be explored. Working in both two and three dimensions, flat tiles, low- and high-relief tiles, and brick will be created. In addition, projects will investigate how abstract and representational images and patterns can be designed across multiple pieces. Composition, rhythm, and repetition will be a major focus.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 2600

    Sophomore Seminar in Studio Art

    4cr
    A combination writing-intensive seminar and studio art course introducing basic and intermediate art concepts and skills, including the writing and speaking skills necessary for discussion and critique of visual art. Through readings and discussions, students will be introduced to contemporary artists, movements, criticism, and theory. Students will also be introduced to studio and professional art practices necessary for careers and further study in the arts. This course is taught in the spring and is open to all students.

  • ART 3000

    Advanced Drawing (FAR)

    4cr
    Advanced drawing with emphasis on the human figure. A studio art course containing theory and practice. Emphasis is on projects that focus on self-portraits, working from models and narrative/figure assignments as part of the development of individual style. A studio art course containing lectures, demonstrations, theory, and practice.
    Prerequisite: Art 2000
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 3010

    Illustration (FAR)

    4cr
    Development of drawing skills with an emphasis on individuality of style and expression. Teaching is directed toward a variety of drawing techniques to be used as a means of communicating ideas for commercial reproduction.
    Prerequisite: None
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 3100

    Studio Photography (FAR)

    4cr
    An introduction to the use of large format view cameras. Technical instruction includes the use of the camera, lighting equipment, film handling, exposure procedures, film development, and printing.
    Prerequisite: ARH 2100 or consent of the instructor

  • ART 3110

    Advanced Darkroom Photography (FAR)

    4cr
    Advanced studio work in photography. Emphasis is placed upon darkroom photography as a creative and expressive medium and is taught from a fine arts perspective. In addition to the technical issues of image-making, the content, aesthetics, and formal qualities of the photographic image are explored. A 35mm camera with manual exposure capabilities is required. This course may be repeated up to three times. This class may be used as an elective in majors and minors in art.
    Prerequisite: ART 2110

  • ART 3200

    Advanced Painting

    4cr
    Advanced studio work in painting with an emphasis on individual work and the formulation of individual language. Independent exploration in areas of interest is highly encouraged within the parameters of class assignments. This course may be repeated up to three times to encompass all media: oil, acrylic, mixed media, and watercolor.
    Prerequisite: ART 2210, ART 2220, or ART 2230
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 3300

    Advanced Printmaking

    4cr
    Advanced studio work in printmaking with an emphasis on individual work and the formulation of a personal visual language. This course may be repeated up to three times.
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 3310

    Graphic Production Techniques

    4cr
    Camera-ready layout will be reproduced through serigraphic printing techniques. A studio art course containing theory and practice.
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Fall

  • ART 3400

    Advanced Sculpture

    4cr
    Advanced studio work in sculpture. Emphasis is on mastery of sculpture's materials and techniques and the interaction of concept and form. Individual and collaborative projects may include working with time, motion, and site-specific installation as well as more traditional freestanding works. This course may be repeated up to three times.
    Prerequisite: None

  • ART 3500

    Advanced Ceramics

    4cr
    Advanced studio work in ceramics with an emphasis on individual work and the formulation of a personal visual language. Students may meet with other ceramics sections. This course may be repeated up to three times.
    Prerequisite: ART 2500 or 2510
    Fall/Spring

  • ART 4000

    Senior Seminar in Studio Art

    4cr
    Senior Seminar in Studio Art provides the Studio Art major with an opportunity to create and install a capstone senior exhibition. The course focuses on development of personal artistic voice, and critical abiity with an awareness of contemporary artists and theory. Along with their artwork, students will exit the course with an artist statement, portfolio, resume, and website.
    Prerequisites: Completion of four studio courses, junior review, and consent of instructor
    Fall

  • ART 4210

    Art Curriculum and Methods: Early Childhood Through Early Adolescent (K-5) (FAR)

    4cr
    Candidates will learn techniques that they can use with elementary students to help them create elementary works of art as well as form an elementary appreciation for art. Emphasis will be placed on applying the National Visual Arts Standards K 8 (developed by the National Art Education Association) to lesson plans. Candidates will explore methods for motivating, creating, and evaluating elementary students' artwork, as well as methods for integrating art across all disciplines. Candidates will plan and implement art lesson plans in local elementary schools for their field experience requirement.
    Prerequsites: Acceptance into the TEP and EDU 2150

  • ART 4220

    Art Curriculum and Methods: Early Adolescent Through Adolescent (6-12)(FAR)

    4cr
    Candidates will learn techniques that they can use with middle and secondary school students to guide their artistic development and enable them to create works of art, as well as form an appreciation for art and art history. Emphasis will be placed on applying the National Visual Arts Standards 612 (developed by the National Art Education Association) to lesson plans. Candidates will explore methods for motivating, creating, and evaluating middle and secondary students' artwork. Candidates will plan and implement art lesson plans in local middle and/or secondary schools for their field experience requirement.
    Prerequisites: Admission into the TEP and EDU 2150

  • Quick Facts

    • Carthage is named a Best Midwestern College by The Princeton Review (2017), a designation given to only 25 percent of four-year schools.

    • Scheduled to open in fall 2018, a new residential tower will offer suite-style housing and two floors of shared campus spaces for gaming, cooking, group meetings, or quiet studying. Learn more about The Tower

    • You’re going to need brain fuel. Grab a morning coffee and a snack and Starbucks or Einstein Bros. Bagels. Later, meet friends at “The Caf,” where the specials change daily but the staples are constant, or swing through “The Stu” for wins, a burrito, or a sub. A new option, Carthage Cash, even covers some off-campus meals.

    • 96% of Carthage alumni report that they have secured a job or are continuing their studies six months after graduation. Visit Career Services.

    • 91% of employers say critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills matter more than your major when it comes to career success. Learn more about how the liberal arts prepare you for a successful career.

    • Lots of schools wear the four-year label. Carthage stands behind it. 95% of Carthage graduates earn their degrees in four years. Learn more

    • Oscars. Emmys. Tonys. Golden Globes. The playwrights we’ve brought in have them. Each year, the Carthage Theatre Department commissions an original script by a renowned playwright for its New Play Initiative. Carthage students then work with the writer to stage it. 

    • As a freshman in the highly selective Honors Program, learn how to gain expertise in anything from music to forest ecology. After that, tackle a contemporary social, economic, or political problem. If you like, you can live on an Honors-only floor of a Carthage residence hall. 

    • In 2016 and 2017, Carthage was named a top producer of Fulbright Scholars by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

    • Things look new at Carthage because they are. Our athletic and recreation center, student union, computer labs, audiovisual production suite, and numerous residence halls have all been constructed or newly renovated in the last 10 years. Our new science center caps it off.

    • Carthage offers majors, minors and concentrations in more than 50 areas of study, from archaeology to athletic training, neuroscience to music theatre.

    • Our Summer Undergraduate Research Experience offers select students a research budget, one-on-one mentoring with a professor, and 10 weeks of analyzing, deciphering — and getting paid.

    • So the lake is kind of a focal point, but there’s a lot more to love about our campus — like the fact that our 80-acre campus is also an arboretum and wildlife sanctuary. Focused on keeping campus lush forever, we plant between 50 and 75 new trees every year from a variety of species.

    • Carthage was founded in 1847. That’s more than 170 years of leaders, makers, and go-getters going out and going forth. Read more about Carthage’s rich history.

    • More than 90 percent of our students receive financial aid, a hefty chunk of which is scholarships and grants — including $1.25 million annually from the Presidential Scholarship Competition and numerous Merit Scholarships. Learn what’s available.

    • Abraham Lincoln was an early Trustee of the College, and U.S. Secretary of State John Hay was a Carthage alum. The two still have a proud place on our campus. Spend some time with them in our Sesquicentennial Plaza. On warm days you’ll find professors leading their classes here.

    • Come to Carthage; hear yourself think — think … think …
      Legend has it that Sesquicentennial Plaza holds a perfect echo. Just stand with both your feet on the “1847,” face Straz, and start talking. “You’re the only one who can hear you, but you’ll be crystal clear,” promises English and theatre alumna Mikaley Osley.

    • Our Great Lake provides Carthage students with some amazing views. Think classes on the beach, lake views from the lab, and sunrises from your dorm room. “I love waking up in the morning with the sun shining off the lake. Nothing compares to the view in the morning,” says biology and neuroscience major Ann O’Leary.

    • Carthage awards up to 30 Presidential Scholarships each year, which range from 75% tuition up to full tuition, room, and board. Learn more.

    • For a full decade, NASA has selected Carthage students to conduct research aboard its zero-gravity aircraft. Lately, the stakes have risen. A team of underclassmen is grinding to prepare a tiny but powerful Earth-imaging satellite for launch to the International Space Station. Learn more about the space sciences at Carthage

    • Carthage is the only college or university in the Midwest where every freshman takes a full-year sequence of foundational texts of the Western intellectual tradition. Learn about the Carthage core.

    • With a student-faculty ratio of 12:1, your professors will know who you are. They will also know who you want to be — and how to get you there. Meet our faculty.

    • There are more than 120 student organizations on campus, from Amnesty International to Chemistry Club, to Frisbee and Latin Belly Dancing. See how easy it is to get involved.

    • True story: There are more than 27 art galleries, a dozen museums, and nine theatres within 25 miles of Carthage. Some highlights: The nationally recognized Racine Art Museum, the world-renowned Art Institute of Chicago, and the Milwaukee Art Museum. Learn more about our location.

    • What’s better than one professor? Two professors. What’s better than two professors? Two professors from totally different fields teaching a single class. There’s debate. Discussion. Differing perspectives. This is where the magic happens. That’s why every student takes a Carthage Symposium.

    • Imagine presenting your original research at an international conference — as an undergraduate. Carthage is dedicated to undergraduate research. Learn more about current opportunities.

    • You can’t hide here — not with only 17 other students in the classroom with you. That’s going to be rough some mornings. But later, when you’re able to argue your point of view thoughtfully, express your opinions succinctly, and meet challenges head-on, without fear … Yep, you’ll thank us.

    • Carthage is ranked No. 11 in the country for student participation in short-term study abroad. Every J-Term, hundreds of students travel all over the world on faculty-led study tours. Imagine a month in Sweden, Rome, Cuba, Senegal, India, Japan …

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